Aviation, Germanwings, Pilot Trustworthiness

Lufthansa Ab Initio Training Part II

By Camilo on May 19, 2015 0 Comments

In this blog post I discussed the amazingly low attrition rate of Lufthansa’s ab initio (from the beginning) pilot training program. Today, something a little different: the change that has ensued in the actual flying portion of pilot training. In 2006, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) created a new qualification, the Multi-Crew Pilot License (MPL). … Continue Reading

Aviation, Germanwings, Pilot Trustworthiness

Lufthansa Ab Initio Training, Part I

By Camilo on May 19, 2015 0 Comments

Here’s a presentation by Lufthansa to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) on their ab initio (from the beginning) pilot training syllabus. Some thoughts on this: Slide 6 depicts the Lufthansa pilot selection process. What is striking about this graphic is the 95-98% success rate in step 3, “pilot school,” (aka flight school.) This is … Continue Reading

Aviation, Pilot Trustworthiness

More Pilot Stories

By Camilo on April 20, 2015 0 Comments

A common question between pilots in an airliner, especially on day 1 of a trip with someone new, is “Where did you start?” We all want to know the past experiences of the pilot next to us. If his (see note below) background is civilian, usually he followed this path: desire to fly/leave current job; … Continue Reading

Aviation, Pilot Trustworthiness

Pilot Stories

By Camilo on April 9, 2015 0 Comments

I’ll start with the conclusion: the civilian path to flying an airliner is analogous to the path to practicing medicine as a doctor: years of expensive schools followed by years of low pay and very hard work. At the end of each process, you have a professional with mad career buy-in. He’s earned it. Let’s … Continue Reading

Aviation, Germanwings, Pilot Trustworthiness

Sucking Up a Seat Cushion

By Camilo on April 6, 2015 0 Comments

This is gross, but pilots have a saying: “sucking up a seat cushion.” It means that things have gotten tense in the cockpit because of some emergency, enemy action or the lack of some aviation essential (runway, altitude, airspeed or fuel). You can imagine a pilot tensing up – all over – under such circumstances, … Continue Reading